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iPad mini For Content Creation

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AppleScript and Notification Center in Mavericks

⌃⌥⌘W is my work-mode toggle. That shortcut fires off a Keyboard Maestro workflow that does a number of things, from killing my email clients to setting all of my chat applications to do-not-disturb mode. If I’m already in work mode, pressing the shortcut again sets my chat status to Available and relaunches my email clients. I use it when going into and coming out of meetings, focused coding sessions, etc.

It also turns off all notifications by -clicking the Notification Center icon in the menu bar.1 Unfortunately, upgrading to Mavericks broke the Notification Center toggle, which is my favorite part of the workflow.

Here’s what the script used to look like:

tell application "System Events"
    tell process "Notification Center"
        key down option
        click first menu bar's first menu bar item
        key up option
    end tell
end tell

After a fair amount of digging, I managed to repair it. For some reason, click first menu doesn’t work anymore; click second menu does. Here’s the updated snippet:

tell application "System Events"
    tell process "Notification Center"
        key down option
        click second menu bar's first menu bar item
        key up option
    end tell
end tell

It’s a small tweak, but I couldn’t find it documented anywhere and discovered it through experimentation. Despite its relative obscurity, I rely on AppleScript quite a bit (and have for quite some time), which makes me wish for more thorough documentation–especially for weird changes like this.


  1. In case you didn’t already know, -clicking the icon in the top right corner of your screen disables all notifications for up to a day. You can re-enable them by -clicking the icon again.  ↩

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This is what Instagram ads will look like. First sample coming to the US in the next week

Lazy Markdown Reference Links for Editorial

I read this article by Brett Terpstra last night and got inspired. He uses a “lazy” Markdown reference link style while writing that removes a bit of work. It looks something like this:

I read [this article][*] by [Brett Terpstra](https://twitter.com/ttscoff "Twitter") last night and got inspired. He uses a "lazy" Markdown reference link style while writing that removes a bit of work. It looks something like this:

[*]: http://brettterpstra.com/2013/10/19/lazy-markdown-reference-links/

Instead of creating a link identifier at the exact moment you create the link, you can use a *. Simple! He included a script that works as a custom preprocessor for Marked, too, that converts the lazy links to numerically indexed reference links.

I loved this idea–it jibes with my writing style–so I adapted it for Editorial.

There are two workflows that you’ll need to install. The first will let you create a lazy reference from either a URL on the clipboard or whatever page is open in the in-app browser. The second workflow parses the lazy references in your document and turns them into proper reference links with numbers for reference IDs.

You can view and install the workflows using the links below.


I ran a quick poll on App.net to see which features of OS X Mavericks people were looking forward to the most. Keep in mind that this crowd skews nerd-heavy, which is why–despite having many options to choose from–only four features made it into the results.